A Poem by Stephen Mead

by: Stephen Mead

Stephen Mead’s poem uses a Georgia O’Keefe painting as the occasion for full blown meditation on how landscape can reveal the transcendent around and in us, a “place” where we find that “…at the center, is an embrace.”

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From The Far Away Nearby
(for Georgia)

Somehow distanced,
Rooted to breeze, the impartial
Sky, these stretches of flung life —

For years I have reached toward
This exact place in time, a setting
Without windows:  open, opening…

Above, hawks swoop.
The desert  collects driftwood.
Here, at the center, is an embrace:
Hard but solvent, an essence, fossil-white,
Ladled & poured…

The canvas depicts a cow’s skull,
One branch fetched from the far away
Nearby, evocative, antler-elegant.

The cactus blossoms, some space
Filled beautifully by holding living
Close
Yet
At arm’s length…

This calla is a landscape.
Bells bong, shiver flesh
From the hills of New Mexico.

I had to come here in order to be.1

 

A resident of NY, Stephen Mead is a published artist, writer, maker of short-collage films and sound-collage downloads.  If you are at all interested and get the time, Google Stephen Mead and the genres of either writing, art, or both, for links to his multi-media work.

  1. Stephen Mead’s poem is inspired by Georgia O’ Keefe’s From the Faraway Nearby, oil on canvas, 1938. []

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